colour, Inspiration

Saturday Inspiration: How to use Analogous Colours

Todays topic is Analogous Colour Schemes! Colour can make or break an image, and yet it is so often overlooked in illustration. There are a number of different techniques to use when trying to make an image cohesive, often revolving around the color wheel.

colour-wheel-colour

Analogous colours are colours that appear next to each other on the colour wheel.

Rather than get too in depth however, why don’t you check out these four colour scheme examples below.  I should note, none of these images are mine until you get to the very bottom.

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Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 9.03.18 PM

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 9.04.21 PM

As you can tell, these images are really quite pleasing, despite the limited range of colour used.

452px-Anders_Zorn_-_Självporträtt_i_rött_(1915)

Anders Zorn (1860-1920) became well known for using an analogous palette in some of his own paintings, sometimes limiting himself to only four colours. (It became so well known that the Zorn palette bears his name today.)

If you are interested in a great colour theory tool, check out kuler.adobe.com, it has an easy to use palette to create your own colour schemes.

Here is a bit of work I did as a part of a larger project. I used collage and found as many magazine images as I could fitting into two analogous themes. I then combined them to create a final image. Here are the two separate collages:

And here is the final image, out of context so it won’t make much sense, but thats ok. Red and green are complimentary colours, so by adding these two collages together I was able to create something that was visually cohesive.

Screen Shot 2013-11-14 at 8.56.42 PM
Well, thats it! Thanks for reading. Get out there and make something.

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3 thoughts on “Saturday Inspiration: How to use Analogous Colours

  1. Thanks Harma. I know what you mean, I do that lots too. Often color theory is pretty boring because it is taught without images, but I love seeing how other people use it!

  2. Pingback: Abders Zorn – Swedish Painter |

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